Kamarband jewellery is superb to accentuate the suppleness of slender waist and add a glamor to feminine look.

Kamarbandh is literally called as Waist (Kamar) Band (Bandh). It’s popular all across the India with different names such as Kamarband jewellery, Cummerbund jewellery, waistband jewellery, waist chain jewellery and so on. It’s worn by fashion and beauty conscious ladies around the waist to glamorize feminine look.

If we cast a glance over the ancient Indian scriptures, we find that Kamarband jewellery was used by the men as well as women to keep the garments on place and beautify their persona. A large number of Hindu deities for instance Lord Krishna is described sporting a waist chain (Patka). Moreover,

Shiva devotees also used to wear Rudraksha waistband jewellery following the ruling of Rudraksha Jabala Upanishad.

Kamarband jewellery has been mentioned in Sanskrit with different terms like Kayabandh, Mekhala (Girdle) and so forth. During the archeological excavation of Indus Valley civilization sites, it is proved that it was used on a large scale. Further, several temple sculptures and miniature paintings also depict the figures wearing this fashion jewellery.

Kayabandh was worn in form of a twisted sash, waist belt or cloth girdle during Kushan, Mauryan and Sunga periods. It was used to secure the Antariya at waist. It was also worn like an enchanting fashion accessory to accentuate the suppleness of slender waist. Statues of Begram and Gandhara depict the figurines wearing Kamarband jewellery in sash style.

In addition to waist, Mekhala was also worn on the hip, hence it was called as hip belt or hip bracelet. It was designed in two types. While -Rasana- girdle was made with pearls and chain, -Kanci- girdle was adorned with tinkling bells. Mekhala (Girdle) finds mention in Sanskrit literature of Kalidas, Jaydev and plenty of other poets. Donor figure and King Kanishka statue of Mathura wear designer belts embellished with metal plaques.

Rajasthani people of elite section also used to wear Kamarbandh jewellery during medieval period.

Namboothiri people living in Kerala also wear this jewellery in design of 3 layer gold string. Here, Gold or silver waist chain jewellery is called as Aranjanam and is offered to a new born baby on Irupathettu ceremony, which is held after 28 days of birth. The people of Lakshdweep wear Kannadi Aracha belt and Adippu belt. Kamarband Jewellery is also popular amidst the Dhodia and Kathodis inhabiting Silvassa. Currently, classical and folk dancers also wear this jewellery during their performance.

Satyajit Banerjee is an expert writer in handicraft arena and writes for Craffts.com, an eCommerce portal for handcrafted and Handmade products. It offers wide range of products across various categories ranging from Online Shopping India, Kamarband jewellery online,kamarband jewellery designs,kamarband jewellery designs, Buy Fashion Jewellery much more.

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